Getting Better With Age: Construction Tips For Senior Living Facilities

Renovation of existing (and occupied) senior living spaces requires top-notch teamwork, experience, and communication to minimize disruption.

Working with a trusted, proven partner can help mitigate disruption for residents, resulting in a smoother makeover.

Here are five tips for successfully negotiating the obstacles associated with expanding and renovating occupied senior housing facilities:

Play it safe. The primary consideration during renovation and construction is always the safety of residents, staff, and workers.

Communicate, communicate, communicate. Residents are naturally interested in construction activities, and — when residents are involved with planning — an environment of trust and increased safety is established. Throughout a project, our team holds “Town Hall” meetings to answer questions from residents and staff.

Control the noise, and minimize inconvenience. When working in an occupied facility, a lot of cooperation and planning is involved. We’ll see that noise, vibration, and dust are controlled to every extent possible.

Respect that infection control is real. We understand that there are some aspects of building for occupied senior facilities that go beyond those of a typical construction project. Throughout construction, our team will maintain tight management of a network of staff and subcontractors, to control potential hazards.

Know the locals (and their schedules.) What are the typical morning and afternoon activities for residents? When do deliveries come in? At what time do residents usually take their walks? Flexible construction schedules can help residents avoid noise, dust, and other inconveniences, so we plan our phases in coordination with the owner and our subcontractors to create the safest, most efficient schedule possible.

Experience and knowledge of sensitive, occupied environments are critical in renovation and construction. If you’d like us to put our know-how to work for you, contact our President Jeff Boehm.